Top 5 Articles of 2012!

2012 was an impressive year for scientific publication in audiology research and hearing aids. Narrowing the selection to 15 or 20 articles was much easier than selecting 5 articles from that respectable ensemble. After some thought and discussion with several colleagues, here are the top 5 articles published in 2012!

Top 5 of 2012

1. Implications of high-frequency cochlear dead regions for fitting hearing aids to adults with mild to moderately severe hearing loss

Cox, R.M., Johnson, J.A., & Alexander, G.C. (2012). Implications of high-frequency cochlear dead regions for fitting hearing aids to adults with mild to moderately severe hearing loss. Ear and Hearing, 33, 573-587.

This article is the second in a series that investigated relationships between cochlear dead regions and benefits received from hearing aids. A sample of patients, diagnosed with high-frequency cochlear dead regions, demonstrated superior outcomes when prescribed hearing aids with a broadband response; as compared to a response that limited audibility at 1,000 Hz. These findings clearly illustrate that patients with cochlear dead regions benefit from—and prefer—amplification at frequencies similar to those with diagnosed cochlear dead regions.

http://journals.lww.com/ear-hearing/Abstract/2012/09000/Implications_of_High_Frequency_Cochlear_Dead.2.aspx

2. The speech intelligibility index and the pure-tone average as predictors of lexical ability in children fit with hearing aids

Stiles, D.J., Bentler, R.A., & McGregor, K.K. (2012). The speech intelligibility index and the pure-tone average as predictors of lexical ability in children fit with hearing aids. Journal of Speech Language and Hearing Research, 55, 764-778.

The pure-tone threshold is the most commonly referenced diagnostic information when counseling families of children with hearing loss. This study compared the predictive value of pure-tone thresholds and the aided speech intelligibility index for a group of children with hearing loss. The aided speech intelligibility index proved to be a stronger predictor of word recognition, word repetition, and vocabulary. These observations suggest that a measure of aided speech intelligibility index is useful tool in hearing aid fitting and family counseling.

http://jslhr.asha.org/cgi/content/abstract/55/3/764

3. NAL-NL2 Empirical Adjustments

Keidser, G., Dillon, H., Carter, L., & O’Brien, A. (2012).  NAL-NL2 Empirical Adjustments. Trends in Amplification, 16(4), 211-223.

The NAL-NL2 relies on several psychoacoustic models to derive target gains for a given hearing loss. Yet, it is well understood that these models are limiting and do not account for many individual factors. The inclusion of empirical adjustments to the NAL-NL2 highlights several factors that should be considered for prescribing gain to hearing aid users.

http://tia.sagepub.com/content/16/4/211.abstract

4. Initial-fit approach versus verified prescription: Comparing self-perceived hearing aid benefit.

Abrams, H.B., Chisolm, T.H., McManus, M., & McArdle, R. (2012). Initial-fit approach versus verified prescription: Comparing self-perceived hearing aid benefit. Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, 23(10), 768-778.

While the outcomes of this study were not surprising, similar data had not been published in the refereed scientific literature. The authors show that patients fit to a prescriptive target (i.e. NAL-NL1) report significantly better outcomes than patients fit to the lower gain targets that are offered in fitting softwares as ‘first-fit’ prescriptions. This study is a testimonial to the importance of counseling patients regarding audibility and the necessity of real-ear measurement to ensure audibility.

http://aaa.publisher.ingentaconnect.com/content/aaa/jaaa/2012/00000023/00000010/art00003

5. Conducting qualitative research in audiology: A tutorial

Knudsen, L.V., Laplante-Levesque, A., Jones, L., Preminger, J.E., Nielsen, C., Lunner, T., Hickson, L., Naylor, G., & Kramer, S.E. (2012). Conducting qualitative research in audiology: A tutorial. International Journal of Audiology, 51, 83-92.

A substantive majority of the audiologic research literature reports on quantitative data, discussing group outcomes and average trends. The challenges faced in capturing individual differences and clearly documenting field experiences require a different approach to data collection and analysis. Qualitative analysis leverages data from transcribed interviews or subjective reports to probe these anecdotal reports. This tutorial paper described methods for qualitative analysis and cites existing studies that have used these analyses.

http://informahealthcare.com.ezproxylocal.library.nova.edu/doi/abs/10.3109/14992027.2011.606283

 

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